How Ayesha's childhood hobby inspired her to be an Artist

How Ayesha's Childhood Hobby Inspired Her To Be An Artist

  • Author : Spenowr
  • Category : Biography

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About Artist

Ayesha Goel

  • Individual Artist

  • New Delhi, India

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Her Journey

Ayesha Goel, a painter and a landscapist, is currently pursuing (BA) English honors from New Delhi, India. She takes orders for customized paintings, providing her clients consultation on the suitable decor for their walls. She likes to experiment with different techniques of paintings and keep herself challenged to excel in her style.

At the age of 5, Ayesha started painting the pictures Indian deities, printed in the newspaper. Her passion for painting started with her love for colours. She remembers “Where everyone hated monday , she used to love them because that was her 'newspaper day'. Drawing and colouring them under the 200% level of her excitement and the next day showing them to her teachers and relatives was such a happiness to her. After that, people started calling her junior painter.” 

Ayesha has been painting for 15 years now. She started as an oil pastel person and gradually explored acrylics or oil paints. Today she works with oil pastels , soft pastels , acrylics and oil paints in one single painting.

 

Her Creative Paintings

Her artwork is a replica of her passion and dedication. She shares, for each landscape painting a light base to the painting is applied with a shade similar to the idea . Then around 3 to 4 layers of paint is applied to complete one section of the painting and for every layer, it takes atleast 2 days for me to complete. She is very specific about her materials, used in the paintings.

 

 

Her struggle started when she decided to charge for her work and wanted some recognition. To overcome this she started displaying her work under online exhibitions like on Instagram.

Ayesha has been awarded by then CM of Delhi Smt. Sheila dixit, at the age of 10. She has also bagged state level winner title four times & represented Delhi in several national and international competitions. She has around 60+ achievements till now.

Ayesha likes to paint at night and work on her college assignments during daytime. This way she has been successful in balancing her art and studies to grow optimally in both aspects of life.

Ayesha believes, a good work comes from passion, practice and talent. She quotes, “Many artists do not feel to promote their work , but one should proudly and actively share his or her art and talent with the world . There is no single 'perfect way' to become successful.” She thanks her art teacher for keeping her motivated throughout the school life and making her learn different techniques.

 

Ayesha’s vision is to keep herself challenged and explore any unfound crevice in the world of art. Her motto for all the budding artists is “NEVER STOP , NEVER GIVE UP”.

Below are some of her best creatives.

 

 

 

 

 

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Description : Her JourneyAyesha Goel, a painter and a landscapist, is currently pursuing (BA) English honors from New Delhi, India. She takes orders for customized paintings, providing her clients consultation on the suitable decor for their walls. She likes to experiment with different techniques of paintings and keep herself challenged to excel in her style. At the age of 5, Ayesha started painting the pictures Indian deities, printed in the newspaper. Her passion for painting started with her love for colours. She remembers “Where everyone hated monday , she used to love them because that was her 'newspaper day'. Drawing and colouring them under the 200% level of her excitement and the next day showing them to her teachers and relatives was such a happiness to her. After that, people started calling her junior painter.” Ayesha has been painting for 15 years now. She started as an oil pastel person and gradually explored acrylics or oil paints. Today she works with oil pastels , soft pastels , acrylics and oil paints in one single painting. Her Creative PaintingsHer artwork is a replica of her passion and dedication. She shares, for each landscape painting a light base to the painting is applied with a shade similar to the idea . Then around 3 to 4 layers of paint is applied to complete one section of the painting and for every layer, it takes atleast 2 days for me to complete. She is very specific about her materials, used in the paintings. Her struggle started when she decided to charge for her work and wanted some recognition. To overcome this she started displaying her work under online exhibitions like on Instagram. Ayesha has been awarded by then CM of Delhi Smt. Sheila dixit, at the age of 10. She has also bagged state level winner title four times & represented Delhi in several national and international competitions. She has around 60+ achievements till now. Ayesha likes to paint at night and work on her college assignments during daytime. This way she has been successful in balancing her art and studies to grow optimally in both aspects of life. Ayesha believes, a good work comes from passion, practice and talent. She quotes, “Many artists do not feel to promote their work , but one should proudly and actively share his or her art and talent with the world . There is no single 'perfect way' to become successful.” She thanks her art teacher for keeping her motivated throughout the school life and making her learn different techniques. Ayesha’s vision is to keep herself challenged and explore any unfound crevice in the world of art. Her motto for all the budding artists is “NEVER STOP , NEVER GIVE UP”. Below are some of her best creatives.

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